Tech

Unity boss called game developers who refuse to monetize “fucking idiots.”

Hot potato: Those of a certain age may remember a time when buying a video game meant a one-time payment for the purchase and full use of the game. Many full-fledged games include some sort of microtransactions these days, but you’ll often find that developers who shy away from such things get praise from gamers. However, Unity CEO John Riccitello does not share this view; he thinks developers who don’t accept monetization are “fucking idiots”.

In an interview with PocketGamer.biz which is primarily about the upcoming merger between Unity and IronSource, a move that will see more than 200 people lose their jobs, Riccitello was asked about developers who are resisting bringing monetization to their games.

“Ferrari and some other high-end car makers still use clay and carving knives,” he said. “It’s a very small part of the gaming industry that works this way, and some of these people are my favorite people in the world that I fight – they are the most beautiful and pure, brilliant people. the biggest fucking idiots.”

Riccitello then talks about the gap between those developers who are “comprehensively concerned with how to understand what makes a product successful” and those who leave the money making to others, such as publicists.

As you can imagine, Riccitello is trending on Twitter right now.

While microtransactions/lootboxes/in-game ads in full-fledged games are always controversial, as we saw in Star Wars Battlefront II and UFC 4, these things tend to be more acceptable in the free-to-play mobile games market. And this is where some will say that Riccitello is right. Diablo Immortal has been criticized for its aggressive microtransaction model, which allows players to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars to maximize character development. And yet, despite the fact that Blizzard’s game received the worst reviews in Metacritic history for this reason, Blizzard’s game made $50 million in its first month of release.

“I’ve seen great games fail because they set the enforcement cycle to two minutes instead of an hour,” Riccitello said. “Sometimes you wouldn’t even notice the difference between a huge success for a product and a huge failure if it wasn’t for this tweak and what it does to the attrition rate. There is not a single developer on the planet who would not need this knowledge. “

Surprisingly, Riccitello chose to go live with something that has always been controversial since the merger with Unity. In addition to labor costs, IronSource is known for creating InstallCore, a content installation and distribution platform that is a popular malware installer. Still, it’s hard to imagine that the former EA boss would care.

Title: TechCrunch




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