Gaming

Turn the tide – New Minecraft world inspires kids to fight floods and climate change

Preston’s new flood defenses, consisting of flood walls, the use of glass panels and embankments, aim to reduce disaster risk in 2015 style.

Andy Brown (right)Environment Protection Agency’s Regional Coastal Flood Risk Manager for Lancashire said: “Flooding is a major issue here in Lancashire, but also more broadly across the country and this issue will become more and more complex so it is very important so that we all focus on it and understand it.

“Minecraft helps us communicate with the public about how we deal with floods and coastal erosion in the context of climate change. This helps young people in particular to understand what is happening and their role in it, because they are the ones who will face the most severe consequences of the climate emergency.

“One of the brilliant aspects of this collaboration with Minecraft is that these games will be available worldwide. If we can get at least a small number of people to think, “I prefer a career in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics related to future flood risk management,” then that will be a big success for us.”

The journey from play to learning is where Minecraft excels. That’s why the EPA and Minecraft turned to BlockBuilders, Brighton’s experts in creating immersive worlds, to create Rivercraft.

Megan Lecky, co-founder and co-director of BlockBuilders, helps Archbishop Temple School students explore the world of Rivercraft.
Megan Lecky, co-founder and co-director of BlockBuilders, helps Archbishop Temple School students explore the world of Rivercraft.

Megan Leckie, co-founder and co-director of BlockBuilders, watched a class at Archbishop Temple School as they studied the Preston replica, which her company spent four months building.

She said: “We took Preston’s 3D data, which is freely available on the Internet, and turned it into a Minecraft world. But this data creates generic buildings, so we collected screenshots and images of Preston and added details to the structures to reproduce them in real life. As the kids explored the area, they felt connected to this place in Minecraft because it looked exactly like their city. They are completely immersed in the experience.”


Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button