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Opening of Big Tilly “Anything is Possible”

Lieutenant Tilly and Dr. Culber sit down and talk in Consultant Culber's office.

Dinah would be proud.
Image: Paramount +

Crew Star Trek: Discovery went through hell a lot in the last a little over three seasons show. We got to the point where it is delightful when they have moments short or longto chill out of all this hell and just sit down and speak through your feelings… “Anything is possible” is all about it in different ways, which led to some pretty serious changes in the series.

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Much of the framing of the episode has to do with the idea of ​​therapy – whether it be Captain Burnham demanding more rest time for his crew after several tough weeks fighting an anomaly, or that literally Dr.Culber can change by running across the bridge and patching people up physically. become a Ship Adviser and patch them mentally, like the Book and Tilly. But not everything in Everything Is Possible is literally about passive emotional training. The episode is largely divided into two plots. First, the Federation and Ni’Var are finalizing negotiations to bring the united Vulcan and Romulan homeworld back into the fold, and Burnham and Sarah are both last minute guests at the hearing at the same time. In another, after talking with Culber about her attempt to rediscover what she wants from her 31st century future, Tilly decides to take a volunteer position with Adira in tow, conducting Starfleet Academy training exercises with a group of young students.

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Image: Paramount +

Let’s start with perhaps the least therapeutic of the two, which says something, because the other involves a series of increasingly deadly disasters and overlapping carnivorous monsters, because it’s actually the more frustrating of the two: Sarah and Burnham on Ni ‘Var. Invited under dubious circumstances by the politically astute Federation president, Rillak, the two officers turned out to be an odd couple in the process. At first glance, this is a chance to witness the story and, in some way, get some of the downtime that Burnham asked her team to do in order to get rid of the stress of figuring out the anomaly. But they are Starfleet officers who have been asked to attend a diplomatic meeting between civilian governments, and this makes their presence difficult. All the more so when Ni’Var President T’Rina discovers a last-minute error that threatens to ruin the proceedings. Ni’Var wants to include a withdrawal clause when returning to the Federation if the same drop in confidence that plucked them from the alliance a century before happens again. To be honest, it is not. Indeed “Gotcha” so much that Ni’Var has every right to make it clear that the Federation needs – and not yet completely – to prove that it has restored that trust. Rillak immediately becomes defensive, becomes hostile and rules out any possible inclusion of such a clause, believing that she needs to show strength, not trust – and if Ni’Var asks for return, other worlds of the Federation can also weaken this even further.

This creates a thrillingly awkward situation for Burnham and Sarah, who, as Starfleet officers and not Federation diplomats, know they cannot interfere even when negotiations seem to fall short. This is a dizzying idea that touches Openinghis own preliminary reflections on the hazy existence of Starfleet itself: it is both a military organization in utopia and an ostensibly research unit intersected with the diplomatic corps. But when it was quickly revealed, thanks to Sarah and Burnham who figured it out, they were brought to Ni’Var as Rillak’s political tools – that they would be an interested third party who could find a way to show a compromise. Ni’Var, after having learned in advance from a source about the “unexpected” amendment, things went awry. This upsets Burnham, who is increasingly worried about her personal relationship with Rillak and how her old penchant for being an effective, crude tool to get her way is being exploited by someone else.

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But there is also a problem that Opening collided over and over again: he cannot allow world-changing events to happen without setting Burnham in their personal heart… The solution to the Federation and Ni’Vara’s problems is not for Burnham or Sarah to convince T’Rina and Rillak to sit down and truly listen to each other and restore that trust that is lacking, or for them to realize that Due to the hazy existence It is difficult for Starfleet to act as a third party arbiter when the Federation itself is involved. Instead, Michael must do herself solution. As the adopted child of the Vulcan family and captain of Starfleet, she decides to establish a neutral advisory committee that will act as a test of balance in Ni’War-Federation diplomatic relations, ensuring that both sides receive impartial guidance and maintain a healthy relationship that will mean that the Federation has incentive to rebuild trust and Ni’Var will not threaten to leave it again. Not only was it unnecessary for the show to center Michael for no particular reason in such a monumental worldview, but it runs counter to the fact that OpeningSeason 4 talks about their characters and their need not to share the burden alone, placing the future of Ni’Var’s relationship with the Federation. right on Michael’s shoulders

Fortunately, the Tilly and Adira arc is much more in line with this idea on several levels. First, the duo discovers that the cadets they have been assigned to work with face an intriguing challenge: After Scorch cut most of the Federation member worlds from each other, they became part of one of the first classes, representing a mix of Starfleet students from different countries. species, and are extremely hesitant to cooperate with each other socially or academically, because they simply do not know how j. Especially since one of them, Hiral, is an Orion, which puts him under the heavy burden of being linked to the Emerald Chain legacy from last season. Nothing on Star Trek However, it can be as easy as overcoming social anxiety and a little bit of racial prejudice, so that immediately Tilly, Adira, and the cadets discover their mission is going terribly wrong and they fall to the ground. wrong Moon. Out is a safe M-class desert world, and inside is a less-safe L-class ice moon that happens to be home to hive species that want to eat bioorganic ingredients found in their Starfleet technology. So far, very Star Trek… Who doesn’t like that a visiting mission went wrong?

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The answer – these kids from the Academy, who immediately fall apart in panic and start gnawing at each other, but Tilly – in a truly outstanding performance by Mary Wiseman, the reason for which becomes very clear by the end of this episode – comes at a moment when she has spent almost all its time on Opening looking for. Ever since we first met Tilly, we’ve noticed the drive to lead others, to prove herself, and how she wanted it for so long was the fastest way to the captain’s chair. She underwent command training, briefly became Sarah’s first officer, and she proved time and time again that she was capable of being her comrade. may refer to… All of this is on display here as Tilly leads her cadets to safety, pushes them to work together, and transforms them all into budding Starfleet officers as she implements a risky plan to force them to leave their shuttle and find a safe place to be. they will head for the waiting Starfleet ship. The day is saved, the kids are learning to interact with each other (even Adira, who gets over her social awkwardness to make new friends, much to Tilly’s delight), and the comfort zone that Tilly wanted to push out of this whole season is good. and really thrown out the window.

… This is how it turns out that her path is not to the captain’s chair in Starfleet, but as a teacher at the academy, and why she resigns her position on board Opening in a heartbreaking, bittersweet song close to “Anything is Possible.” Tilly more than any other character on Opening always represented a different kind Star Trek the character. She was, possibly controversialslightly weirder than we expected; she was empathetic to people like Michael and Sarah; she was a fresh, excitable, energetic liner for all of us who have ever thought about being in Star Trek it was super cool even when he tries his best to kill you. It’s sad to lose her as a permanent member of the team – even if, as she promises to Michael, it’s not over yet and she’ll hang around at Federation headquarters whenever Opening is in the dock. But this is perhaps the best example of a “Anything is Possible” therapeutic core: the most healing lesson of all may be to realize that your calling will lead you to an unexpected place, be it circumstances out of your control, such as , Book and Michael. , or taking control of a new path, as Tilly learns. Even if that means losing one of your best characters at the moment, it’s good to see OpeningThe heroes of Russia are in no hurry to learn this lesson.


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